STRAWBERY BANKE MUSEUM


Photo credit: Fuzzy Face Refuge, a member of the San Clemente Island Goat Breeders Assocation.

SAN CLEMENTE GOATS
Baby Animals: Heritage Breeds partner:
End of the Road Farm (Berwick, ME) 

Status: Critical
Adult Weight: 50-120 lbs
Temperament: Alert

San Clemente goats or San Clemente Island goats get their name from San Clemente Island, located off the coast of Southern California.  The goats first came to the island in the late 1800s when they were imported from San Catalina Island.

This breed adapts easily to many different climates and are generally red or brown with black markings.  At one time the breed had a variety of colors but that range is seen much less frequently today. San Clemente goats are fairly small and are surprisingly similar to deer thanks to their delicate bone structure.  Both male and female San Clemente goats have horns. The breed is quite gentle; the females also make very attentive mothers. Speaking of mothers, did you know that baby goats are called kids?

The Livestock Conservancy along with the University of Cordoba in Spain, conducted a genetic study of San Clemente goats in 2007 and found that the genes of the breed are unique, meaning that they are different from many other goat breeds.  Currently there are approximately 750 known San Clemente goats left in the world. They are considered critically endangered by the Livestock Conservancy.

Baby Animals: Heritage Breeds at the Banke partner End of the Road Farm is owned by John and Lisa LaPierre.  The LaPierres care for and breed these goats to try and help save them. The LaPierres are also members of the San Clemente Island Goat Breeders Association, a non-profit dedicated to promoting and preserving the historical traits of the island goat and their unique genetic diversity.

Activity: Start 'kidding' around with these short videos from past Baby Animals and from the San Clemente Island Goat Breeders Association.


Munch, munch, munch. Enjoy watching this video from the SCIGBA of a baby San Clemente Island goat eating his lunch.


Too cute for words. Listen to these baby goats say hello. 


Wise words from this baby goat. "Play nice today! Take the high road when someone tests your patience."
 

Return to event